Pentagon awards $342m COVID-19 vaccines contract to Glaxo

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THE Pentagon  yesterday announced a $342 million contract has been awarded to British pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline to deliver “mass quantities of COVID-19 vaccines to US troops.

  It said GSK was the only company to make a bid for the contract, which will consist of supporting “military locations and personnel throughout the continental US and outside the continental US.

  The work will be carried out in North Carolina “with an estimated completion date of Feb. 28, 2021,” the Pentagon said.

The US Army will supervise execution of the project.

  Similarly, Pharma giants Sanofi and GSK said Wednesday they have agreed to supply Britain with up to 60 million doses of a potential COVID-19 vaccine.

  The agreement covers a vaccine candidate developed by France’s Sanofi in partnership with the UK’s GSK and is subject to a “final contract”.

  Amid a global race to find a vaccine to halt the pandemic, Sanofi announced “ongoing discussions with the European Commission, with France and Italy on the negotiation team, and other governments to ensure global access to a novel coronavirus vaccine.”

SEE ALSO:  London’s Imperial College to begin human testing of new COVID-19 vaccine

  Both companies voiced in a statement their commitment “to making their COVID-19 vaccine candidate affordable and available globally”.

  The vaccine candidate “has the potential to play a significant role in overcoming the COVID-19 pandemic, both in the UK and around the world,” said GSK Vaccines President Roger Connor.

  In Brazil, health care workers are on the front line of the coronavirus pandemic in more ways than one, treating patients but also volunteering to test some of the most promising experimental vaccines.

  Brazil is the country with the second-highest number of infections and deaths in the pandemic, after the United States, and the virus is still spreading quickly here.

 That is bad news in every way but one: it makes the South American country an ideal testing ground for potential vaccines against the virus.

  The job of guinea pig falls to medical staff who work in facilities treating patients infected by the virus, because they are the most likely to come into contact with it, enabling researchers to run a controlled experiment to see how well it works.

SEE ALSO:  WHO raises hope on COVID-19 vaccines

  “I want to contribute, and this is my contribution — through science,” said pediatrician Monica Levi, one of 5,000 volunteers in Brazil helping test one of the most promising vaccines so far, developed by Oxford University and pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca.

  Levi, 53, works at the Specialized Clinic for Infectious and Parasitic Diseases and Immunizations (Cedipi) in Sao Paulo, the epicenter of the outbreak in Brazil, where more than 2.5 million people have been infected so far, with more than 90,000 deaths.

  “Vaccination is my cause. So I have to act on my beliefs,” she aid.

  Last week, Brazil also became the first country carrying out Phase 3 trials of Chinese vaccine CoronaVac, developed by pharmaceutical firm Sinovac Biotech.

  Phase 3 clinical trials involve large-scale testing on humans, the last step before vaccines seek regulatory approval.

SEE ALSO:  WHO raises hope on COVID-19 vaccines

  Medical workers play the starring role in testing that vaccine, too.

 “They pick health care professionals because we are constantly at risk,” Levi said.

  Volunteers must be between 18 and 55 years old, work in a patient care role and have no underlying medical conditions.

Half the volunteers in the Oxford trial are receiving the vaccine and the other half a placebo.

  But they will only know which a year from now.

Levi got her shot on July 21, and had a headache and chills the first day, she said. 

  “But I don’t even know if they gave me the vaccine or the  placebo,” she added.

  While she waits to find out — and to learn whether the vaccine is the exit from the pandemic that the whole world is hoping for — she goes to regular check-ups where researchers monitor her health.

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